Ever dream of a trip where lunch could walk on two legs and wear fur? Pack your time machine and head to the African savanna 1.45 million years ago because those early human ancestors may have had a surprising menu item: each other!

Yes, you read that right. A recent bone discovery suggests our prehistoric kin were not just tool-wielding hunters, they were also occasional meat-lovers with a taste for something…close to home. Think of it as the original paleo diet, only a bit more personal.

The evidence? A shin bone at the Nairobi National Museum with some very suspicious-looking scratches. Scientists reckon these were not the work of playful lions but of another hominin with a sharp stone blade and a hankering for some prime calf muscle. Now, whether they were sharing a friendly snack or settling a prehistoric score is anybody’s guess.

Scientists reckon these were not the work of playful lions or sabre tooth cats but of another hominin with a sharp stone blade and a hankering for some prime calf muscle.

Of course, this is not the only sign that early humans were not shy about nibbling on their neighbours. There are whispers of similar skull-snacking incidents from South Africa, and later on, Neanderthals seem to have developed a taste for “me you” meals when times got tough.

But do not let this scare you off your time-travelling safari! Think of it as a reminder that history, like a good stew, is full of unexpected ingredients. Who knows, maybe you will stumble upon a cave painting depicting a prehistoric barbeque, complete with leg-bone skewers and roasted knuckles!

There are whispers of similar skull-snacking incidents from South Africa, and later on, Neanderthals.

Remember, if you are invited to a Paleolithic potluck, stick to the berries and nuts. You never know what the main course might be!

Pro tip: Pack some extra hand sanitiser—those stone tools were not exactly sterilised.

Bonus: Fun facts for dinner table conversation

  • Lions might have joined the feast on this shin bone, leaving their bite marks.
  • Some experts think cannibalism in our ancestors might have been more like scavenging than full-on hunting.
  • Later on, cannibalism may have become part of rituals and ceremonies, not just a quick snack.
  • So, there you have it! A glimpse into our early ancestors’ messy, fascinating world, where family dinners could get a little…primal. Happy travels (and remember, bring your own food)!